LCP

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Matthew Page's picture

Matt is an endurance nut who loves big rides and big events. Former full time racer and 24hr event specialist but now happy riding off-road on gravel bikes or XC mountain bikes and exploring the mountains and hills of Mid Wales.

4 comments

2 months 2 weeks ago

Chris RideFar wrote:

I'm not convinced that you can objectively test wheel stiffness / ride harshness by riding them. Most of the judgements of these wheel attributes are based on pre-conceived biases in materials and rim height plus the amount of noise that the rim makes when riding. To actually claim that the rims give a "harsh" ride I would want some objective numbers from a proper measuring device, which a human is pretty poor at doing in this case. In terms of lateral rigidity, I cannot imagine a situation in which less would be better. In terms of vertical compliance, rims are made so as to minimize that so that they are both strong and efficient.

There is no preconceived judgment, and it is often what you don't expect that makes it easier to notice.

Riding a fair amount, frequently changing elements the differences are noticeable. When riding on the same trails, and only one part is changed, the difference can be felt.

With regards to rim rigidity, it is common for downhill mountain bike mechanics to adjust spoke tension for specific tracks, and conditions. Zipp created the 101 XPLR, and 3ZERO MOTO to have the same effect, with compliance within the rim to stay in contact with the ground.

The same movement won't be needed for gravel riding to the same extent for downhill mountain biking, but it does still have an effect.

2 months 2 weeks ago

Secret_squirrel wrote:

This review doesnt make any sense to me.  I dont see how the below can be true if you are running tyres at gravel pressures.

"On a typical forest road surface, the level of vibration feedback to the handlebars is significant, and more than on other gravel-oriented wheelsets I've tested. "

All elements, from the spokes through the rims, fork, handlebar, stem, and bar tape make a difference. This happens irrespective of tyre pressure, which of course, also makes a difference.

2 months 2 weeks ago

I'm not convinced that you can objectively test wheel stiffness / ride harshness by riding them. Most of the judgements of these wheel attributes are based on pre-conceived biases in materials and rim height plus the amount of noise that the rim makes when riding. To actually claim that the rims give a "harsh" ride I would want some objective numbers from a proper measuring device, which a human is pretty poor at doing in this case. In terms of lateral rigidity, I cannot imagine a situation in which less would be better. In terms of vertical compliance, rims are made so as to minimize that so that they are both strong and efficient.

2 months 3 weeks ago

This review doesnt make any sense to me.  I dont see how the below can be true if you are running tyres at gravel pressures.

"On a typical forest road surface, the level of vibration feedback to the handlebars is significant, and more than on other gravel-oriented wheelsets I've tested. "

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